How Gulf Shrimp Became The King of Shrimp

It’s easy to find popcorn shrimp, in fact, we are a popcorn shrimp nation. We are enthralled by endless shrimp platters and all-you-can-eat seafood buffets and love overstuffed po’boys, steaming bowls of scampi, takeout containers dripping with kung pao, and one of Louisiana’s favorite: Cajun seasoned shrimp. However, for those of us, that know shrimp know that popcorn shrimp is a fraud.

Increasingly, cooks are always wondering if we are eating the right shrimp. Like much of the food we eat, shrimp comes with issues: sustainability, eating locally and guarding against disease. In a chef’s world, the wonder what tastes the best. Almost 90 percent of the American shrimp supply is imported mostly from India, Thailand, and Indonesia. However, it has been a tough couple of years for imported shrimp due to an incurable bacterial disease that has devastated many shrimp farms.

Luckily in New Orleans and other shrimping capitals of the South, shrimp is still in good supply. When chefs look at the type of shrimp that they will be using, it all depends on the dish and region. South Carolinians insist on white shrimp whereas some people grew up on the wild taste of brown shrimp from the Gulf of Mexico. Pink shrimp have their fanbase as well as the Royal Reds.

In the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, Louisiana residents formed the White Boot Brigade, named after the shrimper’s rubber footwear and began a nationwide campaign to introduce it to chefs across the country. Gulf shrimp has become a huge success and is used in a variety of dishes. Now, people all over the US enjoy the delicious and unique taste of gulf shrimp, and here at Slap Ya Mama, we love to upgrade dishes with our delicious seasonings.

Dinner should never be boring in your household. With the help of Slap Ya Mama seasonings, your dishes will have that unique cajun taste that you love! No matter what type of shrimp you decided to cook, we hope that you enjoy this delicious shrimp recipe and share it with your loved ones.

Variations on Gumbo And Other Unique Recipe Ideas

A good gumbo is widely disputed, and there are so many different ways that it is served that some people might be confused about what is real and what is an imitator. You’re probably familiar with seafood gumbo as well as the classic chicken and andouille sausage gumbo, but there are many other ways to eat this popular dish than you may know. As restaurants around the globe try to imitate what is often sought out in Louisiana, let’s take a look at the different forms and variations of gumbo.

Creole Gumbo
What makes a gumbo creole is one extra ingredient: tomatoes. The roux that is made for this specific type of gumbo is also a light colored roux and usually paired with seafood. However, many locals would argue that tomatoes are NEVER supposed to come close to the gumbo pot.

Gumbo Z’herbes
As in most culinary cultures, religion has a great impact on the dishes of South Louisiana. In the predominantly Catholic region of Acadiana, meat is consumed sparingly during the Lenten season leading up to Easter. Gumbo Z’herbes, (gumbo of herbs), has become an alternative usually served on Holy Thursday or Good Friday and contains nine different kinds of herbs.

Egg Gumbo
Sometimes they are boiled, and sometimes they are poached. Either way, many people enjoy adding an egg or many eggs to their gumbo. Some people even drop in whisked eggs to make their gumbo similar to egg drop soup.

Gumbo with Potato Salad
When it comes to potato salad in gumbo, you either read this and knew exactly what we are talking about or thought that we had lost our mind. The gumbo potato salad has no eggs or pickles and is mostly mashed and is perfect for eating with gumbo, whether you scoop it right into the gumbo bowl, or serve it on the side. This concept is regional and comes from the most southern parts of Louisiana.

Gumbo with Okra
The word gumbo comes from the Bantu word “achinggumbo” which translates to okra. While it may be etymologically correct to say that all gumbos must contain okra, that isn’t always the case. Some Louisiana cooks have a distaste for okra and use other thickening agents such as filé instead of okra.

Here at Slap Ya Mama, we know all about Gumbo. We love gumbo so much, we have a prize-winning gumbo recipe of our own. We always love experimenting with new unique recipe ideas, so who knows which of these gumbos we will try next. Do you have a gumbo recipe that differs from the norm? Let us know in the comments!

Crawfish Boils: A Time for Experimentation

As we move towards Easter, there is a lot to be excited about. Here in Louisiana in the season of Lent, we look forward to crawfish boils the most. The basics of a crawfish boil are simple: a big pot, heat source, water, zesty seasoning, veggies, crawfish and a handful of newspapers.

Everyone’s family does Crawfish boils differently. While the standard crawfish boil recipe includes lemons, some people have branched out and tried orange slices as well as adding orange juice along with garlic puree. Others like to use pineapple and then make a pineapple salsa as an appetizer. The experimentation doesn’t stop there.

When it comes to a crawfish boil, some people rather just pour everything out of the pot and have a feast while others feature the crawfish as the main dish and take the other parts to make other recipes. Poking holes in canned vegetables that you plan to use to cook a side dish or putting them in bags allow these vegetables to soak in all of the flavors during the boil.

While the go-to vegetables for a crawfish boil are corn and potatoes, other vegetables include string beans, carrots, artichokes, edamame, beets, sweet potatoes, mushrooms, turnips, habanero peppers, okra, cauliflower, asparagus and even cactus leaves.

If there’s anything we love to put in anything in Louisiana: it’s meat. Sausage is a common staple for a crawfish boil while people have begun to boil chicken, turkey, pig feet and tails, frog legs, alligator and more in their boils to kick up the flavor.

Here at Slap Ya Mama, we know the best part about crawfish boils is spending time with your loved ones. Slap Ya Mama has a variety of zesty seasoning options that are perfect for your next crawfish boil, no matter what you put in the pot. Be sure to check out our Seafood Boil!

 

The Best Cajun Spice Blend in Louisiana

You’ve heard our story– while running the Walker family deli, Anthony “TW” Walker started his search for the best cajun spice blend that had a real Cajun pepper taste without the heavy salt content of the national brands. When he couldn’t find one, he did what folks in this part of the country do best—he went to work and dreamed one up. Enlisting the help of his children to mix his seasoning during their playtime, the Walker & Son’s business took “family ran and owned” to a new level.

Everybody loved the Walkers’ Cajun seasoning so much, that pretty soon it needed a name. To the folks who came into the deli asking to take home the Cajun seasoning, TW would often proclaim,“When you use this seasoning, the food tastes so good, you will receive a loving “slap” on the back and a kiss on the cheek as a thank you for creating another great tasting Cajun dish.” Made with only ingredients of the highest quality, it’s no wonder our seasoning has made its way into the spice cabinet of everyone around here.

If you are ready to experience the three pillars of Slap Ya Mama that started it all, check out our Original Blend of seasonings, our Hot Blend of Cajun zesty flavors, and our White Pepper Blend for those who want a better kick outside of ordinary black pepper. Try them all today and start “slapping” your favorite meals with Slap Ya Mama Seasonings. Slap Ya Mama’s Cajun Hot Sauce delivers a rush of Cajun flavor to your favorite dishes. It’s the same great taste you love from our traditional Cajun Pepper Sauce but with a lot more heat for those spicy connoisseurs. We would love to hear how you use the best cajun spice blend in your household!

 

History of Cajun Spices

The history of Cajun spices is as rich and varied as the history of Louisiana. Cajun cooking comes from the native French-speaking Acadian descendants inhabiting Louisiana and parts of other Southern states. Like the area it comes from, Cajun flavor is spicy, rich, and really, really flavorful! This style of cuisine also borrows from African and Native American styles of cookery. A lot of people don’t know that the typical Cajun food was developed by extremely poor people. Refugees and farmers used what they had readily available to feed large families, which is one reason that rice is a staple in most Cajun dishes. Adding rice to a stew could stretch the food so that there would be plenty to eat for days. Rice is still added to Cajun food, even if it is for the love of the flavor, and not for necessity.

Since Cajun country is so close to the Gulf of Mexico, seafood is a main protein in most dishes. Favorites are crawfish, catfish, crabs, and oysters. Seafood was accessible and available, as there were a lot of fishermen. Cajun dishes almost always consist of three vegetables referred to as the “Holy Trinity:” bell pepper, onions, and celery. Parsley, bay leaves, and scallions are commonly used to season food, as well as garlic and cayenne pepper. Gumbo, a staple dish across all cajun kitchen tables, takes its name from the West African and Caribbean name for okra, which is often another main ingredient in many dishes.

Cajun food, despite its reputation, is not necessarily spicy hot. Cajun spice blends are often richly flavored without heat, although some cajun spices will certainly burn you! At Slap Ya Mama, we carry a selection of Cajun Seasoning and hot sauces ranging from original which has a pleasant moderate heat, to HOT, for folks who like the burn. For ways to use our cajun spices and blends, check out our recipes section. For the families who may not be Cajun through and through, we do have dinner mixes available with the seasonings already added so that you can experience the full flavor of the deep south no matter where you are!

Game Time Food

Its that time of the year again to put on your favorite jersey, gather with friends, prepare some incredible food and cheer on your favorite team. If you want to spice up your favorite dishes, try adding a little (Or a lot!) of Slap Ya Mama authentic Cajun seasoning to spice up your favorite game day food.

Slap Ya Mama CAJUN STYLE CRISPY ONION RINGS 4 slap ya mama Parmesan Grilled Corn Crispy Oven Baked Parmesan Garlic Fries Loaded Sweet Potato Skins game day food Slap Ya Mama Sliders image large

 

Italian Nice With A Touch Of Cajun Spice

In the late 1800’s, Sicily endured some rough times, causing many natives to leave the Italian Island. Sicilians took ships to the major ports of the United States, with many staying in the country’s second-largest port, New Orleans. Living on an island meant many Sicilians made their living as fishermen, and their diet reflected this. Being close to the sea is one of the reasons so many Sicilians didn’t move further inland.

The Sicilians brought their culture and cuisine with them upon immigration, particularly an Italian-style tomato sauce. Just as she absorbed the French and Spanish before them, New Orleans absorbed the Italians. New Orleanians took the idea of Italian-style tomato sauce and mixed it with roux, the flour-and-grease base for sauces. Over time, the classic “red sauce” became “red gravy,” called that to distinguish it from the “brown gravy” New Orleanians made for generations. To make the distinction between traditional cuisine and the modified style of Italians raised in New Orleans, some restaurants and restaurant reviewers began to refer to the modified style as “Creole-Italian” cooking.

An obvious homegrown Italian contribution to the cuisine of the Crescent City is the muffuletta, a hearty sandwich of salami and provolone topped with a distinctive olive salad. Muffulettas, found at delis across the country, originated at Central Grocery on Decatur St. in the Quarter, a store that is still selling them to this day. Another great example of Creole-Italian fusion is the change that happened to the classic Italian recipe for scampi. Since there were no scampi here, Italian cooks used the plentiful local Gulf shrimp instead. This dish evolved into a new dish: the spicy, buttery and misnamed “barbecue shrimp”. The dish spread to restaurants and homes and is now one of the most famous New Orleans dishes.

Slap Ya Mama is a big fan of the fusion between different cultures and our array of spices and sauces are excellent at bridging that gap. Add Slap Ya Mama Original Blend Seasoning to your favorite Italian dishes to create Creole-Italian fusion in your own kitchen or check out some of the recipes we have created. Let us know some of your favorite Creole-Italian fusion recipes in the comments!

Five New Ways to Use Hot Sauce

In Louisiana, we love hot sauce. Hot sauce originated in the early 1800s and is believed to have gotten its start in Cajun cooking, and now many selections of all-natural hot sauce come in different levels of spice and flavor. Food experts think that our love for hot sauce is all in our head, saying that spicy food does not actually cause any physical harm to a well-functioning digestive system. Our brain contains chemical molecules and excites the pain receptors on your tongue that are linked to the sensation of temperature. A study from the 80’s demonstrated a connection between enjoyment of roller coasters and a passion for spice and discovered that thrill seekers were more likely to enjoy spicy foods. If you’re a thrill seeker looking for that adrenaline rush in your food, here are five new ways to utilize hot sauce.

Mexican Hot Chocolate
Hot chocolate is the comforting milky and sweet, delicious beverage that we love when the weather gets cooler, but why not spice it up? Add a couple of dashes of hot sauce to your mug to get an extra kick.

Eggs
Bodybuilders and people looking to shed fat love this combination because of the low-calorie flavor that hot sauce provides. Adding hot sauce to your eggs gives your protein an extra dash of character and will be a staple in your home.

Popcorn
Popcorn is a popular snack with many varieties such as white cheddar, caramel, and the beloved butter flavor. Try adding a drizzle of hot sauce over your popcorn during your next movie night.

Pizza
If you’ve ever seen the movie Selena, you’ll remember the scene where Jon Seda douses his pizza with hot sauce. Sometimes, the tomato sauce isn’t enough of a kick.

Hummus
Hummus is delicious as a dip for veggies, pita, crackers and an excellent spread for sandwiches and wraps. Adding some hot sauce in your hummus will give you the kick that you need to amplify your hummus experience.

Here at Slap Ya Mama, we know that different people like different hot sauces and that’s why we have four different types of delicious all-natural hot sauce. Let us know in the comments what foods you love our hot sauce with. We would love to know more!

All About Gumbo

The Comfort Food of Louisiana

 

easy cajun dishes

 

Locals, transplants, and tourists alike know that Louisiana is known for its delicious and unique cuisine with gumbo being one of the most sought out dishes. Fall in Louisiana is a brief transition separating our warm summers from the relatively mild winters. It would be more appropriate to call this time of year gumbo season. Gumbo is a hearty, stew-like soup that is beloved across Louisiana. This dish crosses all class barriers, appearing on the tables of the poor and the wealthy, alike. The ingredients can vary widely from one cook to the next and from one region of the state to another, but two elements are constant: roux, a sauce thickener that is a mix of equal parts flour and fat, and the trinity, a blend of onion, celery, and bell pepper. 

To thicken a gumbo, filé (sassafras leaves ground into a powder) or okra can be added. There are no set rules as far as the primary meat, although the most popular versions of gumbo are either chicken and sausage based or seafood based. Gumbo is often cited as an example of the melting-pot nature of Louisiana cooking. The name itself is derived from the West African word for okra, suggesting that gumbo was originally made with okra. Dr. Carl A. Brasseaux of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette found in his research that the first documented references to gumbo appeared around the turn of the 19th century. Gumbo has influence from many different cultures including Choctaw, French, Cajun, Creole, and African. The stew-like soup is viewed as a mixture of all cultures and influences in one pot that everyone is bound to enjoy.

Walker & Sons has formulated an alternative to preparing your favorite Cajun dishes. When it comes to gumbo, many families take a full day out of their schedule to make this dish perfect. In 2017, it’s difficult to find the time to devote to this dish. Slap Ya Mama has perfected our dinner mixes so that you and your family can enjoy easy cajun dishes. In just minutes and with little effort, you can have great tasting, stove cooked gumbo for the entire family. Just add your chicken and sausage or seafood, bring to a boil, let it simmer and serve it.

Catch the Asian Cajun Wave

“To some, the mix of Asian and Cajun may sound bizarre but to people in South Louisiana, it feels like the next perfect step into culinary bliss. “

In the mid-1970’s after the fall of Saigon, a large wave of Vietnamese made their way down to New Orleans. There are a few reasons that made the incoming Vietnamese feel as if this could be the perfect place to call home. The top reasons were the very familiar subtropical climate and the large Catholic population in the New Orleans area. Yes, most of the Vietnamese in South Louisiana are Roman Catholic and were brought here by Catholic Charities. The Vietnamese community now makes up nearly 3% of the total population in New Orleans.

As the Vietnamese started into the local workforce, they began to work in a variety of businesses. Now the majority of the population is in the restaurant and seafood industry.  Vietnamese cuisine was heavily influenced by the French from the get-go, so the transition to Cajun was a no-brainer and the wave of fusion cooking has been steadily growing. It seems as if you can’t look for a recipe without seeing some type low-sodium fusion recipe or something titled Casian hot wings. The locals enjoying this fusion already have a taste for seafood and now most of them have grown-up with the large Vietnamese population, so it is a very comfortable mix. Whether it’s a bahn mi, a Vietnamese po-boy, or a steamy bowl of pho seasoned with low sodium Cajun seasoning that you are looking for, you don’t have to go far.  The local New Orleans people seem to love this fusion. The Vietnamese have also taken the beloved King Cake and made it a little better with the best king cake of 2017 award going to a Vietnamese bakery in New Orleans East.

If you are interested in trying a fusion recipe do not hesitate to add a Slap Ya Mama product like our fantastic hot sauce or one of our seasoning blends like the white pepper or low-sodium. You will be pleased!

The Story of Cajun Cuisine

A History as Rich as the Flavor

Cajun Cuisine, known for its spicy notes and heartiness, is a style of cooking that developed in the South after Acadian immigrants fled Canada in the 18th century. It was developed by a population that lived off the land and has adapted over centuries of cultural influences and geographical changes.

The Acadians were the original French settlers in North America and immigrated to Canada in the early 1600s. It was important that these settlers lived off of what was readily available to them: using meat and vegetables cooked in a thick sauce in a single pot. In 1755, they refused to pledge allegiance to the British Crown in 1755 and more than 14,000 Acadians were deported and made their way to Louisiana.

When they settled in the South, these French-Canadian farmers once again adapted their cuisine to the ingredients that were at hand in the region. Their cuisine evolved to include crab, oysters, shrimp, catfish, crawfish and even alligator. Bell Peppers, celery, and onions thrived in Louisiana’s hot and sticky climate and were a staple in their cuisine known as the holy trinity that Louisiana natives use to this day. Louisiana is known as being a melting pot of cultures and these cultures have influenced the cuisine heavily throughout history. As a result, Cajun food was also heavily influenced by African, Native-American, and Caribbean cultures which, in turn, spiced things up a bit. Garlic powder, paprika, black pepper, onion powder, cayenne pepper, oregano, thyme, salt and red pepper flakes were all incorporated in their delicious dishes.

In the present day, these Cajun recipes have been passed down from generation to generation with slight differences in the recipes from family to family.  Slap Ya Mama seasoning is a staple in homes across Louisiana for offering the delicious Cajun blend of spices that takes your gumbo to the next level of flavor with several different options: Original Cajun, Hot Cajun, White Pepper Blend, and Low Sodium Cajun Seasoning. If you are looking for the perfect seasoning blend for your Cajun recipes, SLAP your food with our authentic seasoning blends!  

 

Mama’s Toy Box – Toy Drive

Mama’s Toy Box – Toy Drive

TW of Slap Ya Mama

Tony “TW” Walker building toy boxes

Holiday season is always a time of giving and that holds true here, at Slap Ya Mama.  Over the past couple of years we have held a toy drive at our annual Slap Ya Mama Christmas Party.  Each person attending our party was required to bring a new toy with them for the toy drive.  We would then collect all these toys and donate them to our local church.  It was a great success and we would usually donate anywhere from 100 to 150 toys to the church, who would then distribute them to those children in need around Evangeline Parish.  Everyone was satisfied with the outcome but we felt like we could do something a little more.

This year we have created “Mama’s Toy Box” to help facilitate the gathering of toys for the children of Evangeline Parish.  Our father, TW, hand built 11 toy boxes and stamped them with our “Mama’s Toy Box” logo.  He and our mother, Jennifer, distributed them to 11 designated locations throughout Ville Platte, LA.  The toy boxes will be available to collect toys until December 14th.  So please, if you’re in the Evangeline Parish area, pass by one of the listed designated spots around Ville Platte and make a toy donation to Mama’s Toy Box.

We have once again partnered with the First Baptist Church of Ville Platte and they will be distributing the toys to the in need children of Evangeline Parish.  Daniel Holsomback, the Associate Pastor of First Baptist Church of Ville Platte, had this to say about the distribution of toys, “Our goal is to help as many children as possible with a dire need.  We compile our list of children based on information we receive from the Evangeline Parish School Board Office as well as from some of our own investigation.

With your donation and the help of our partners, we feel as though we will be able to provide many many children with a joyful Christmas this holiday season.  Thank you in advance for your help and we wish everyone the Merriest of Christmases!

Slap Ya Mama - Mama's Toy Box

Jennifer Walker and Mama’s Toy Box Partners. Look for these toy boxes at the locations below to make a charitable drop off.

Mama’s Toy Box Drop Off Locations:


Slap Ya Mama Cajun Products
1679 West Main St
Ville Platte, LA 70586

First Baptist Church of Ville Platte
750 West Main St
Ville Platte, LA 70586

Ville Platte Chamber of Commerce
306 West Main St
Ville Platte, LA 70586

Evangeline Bank & Trust
497 West Main St
Ville Platte, LA 70586

JD Bank
1311 West Lasalle St
Ville Platte, LA 70586

Village De Memoire
1001 N Reed St
Ville Platte, LA 70586

Evangeline Parish Clerk of Court
200 Court St#104
Ville Platte, LA 70586

Villle Platte City Hall
126 E Main St
Ville Platte, LA 70586

Fontenot’s Hatchery
5592 Vidrine Rd
Ville Platte, LA 70586

Lemoine & Associates
423 E Main St
Ville Platte, LA 70586

Citizens Bank
841 West Main St
Ville Platte, LA 70586