Mama’s Chicken & Sausage Gumbo

Mama’s Chicken & Sausage Gumbo

Looking to experience some of Louisiana’s finest dishes? Try Slap Ya Mama’s Chicken & Sausage Gumbo recipe. Delivering unparalleled Louisiana Cajun flavor from our home in Ville Platte, LA. After trying our recipe, you’ll love it so much you’ll want to come on down to visit us at our home.

Gumbo is one of those authentic dishes whose roots are deeply ingrained in Louisiana’s culture and people. There are many variations of gumbo all over Louisiana and each variation is authentic and delicious in its own right.  With Ville Platte being located in south-central Louisiana, we didn’t have consistent access to seafood or many other ingredients you might find in other gumbos.  We instead made a gumbo with the ingredients that are most abundant in our area, such as chicken and pork.  For that reason we traditionally prepare a Chicken & Sausage Gumbo with a dark roux.  During the cold winter months a very large pot of gumbo was often made and we would eat on it for a couple of days.  We had no complaints of eating leftovers when it came to gumbo because it actually gets better with time.

This winter, try preparing a chicken & sausage gumbo.  Make a large pot of it so you can eat on it for days and keep the smiles coming from all that get to enjoy it.

Ingredients:

Directions:

In a 10-12 quart pot over high heat, fill ½ way with water and bring to a boil.  Add ¾ jar of roux, boil until roux is completely dissolved, stirring occasionally.  Reduce to medium heat; add sausage, onions, bell peppers, garlic and 2 tbsp of Slap Ya Mama Original Blend Seasoning.  Boil for 15 minutes.  With the remaining ½ tbsp. of Slap Ya Mama Original Blend Seasoning, season chicken and add to pot.  Add water to pot until it is almost full.  Bring to a boil and boil for 1 hour.  With 10 minutes remaining of the hour boil, add parsley and green onions.  Reduce low heat.  Serve over rice, add a few dashes of Slap Ya Mama Pepper Sauce and enjoy!

If you are having trouble finding Roux or Smoked Pork Sausage, try Teet’s Food Store of Ville Platte, Louisiana.

Variations on Gumbo And Other Unique Recipe Ideas

A good gumbo is widely disputed, and there are so many different ways that it is served that some people might be confused about what is real and what is an imitator. You’re probably familiar with seafood gumbo as well as the classic chicken and andouille sausage gumbo, but there are many other ways to eat this popular dish than you may know. As restaurants around the globe try to imitate what is often sought out in Louisiana, let’s take a look at the different forms and variations of gumbo.

Creole Gumbo
What makes a gumbo creole is one extra ingredient: tomatoes. The roux that is made for this specific type of gumbo is also a light colored roux and usually paired with seafood. However, many locals would argue that tomatoes are NEVER supposed to come close to the gumbo pot.

Gumbo Z’herbes
As in most culinary cultures, religion has a great impact on the dishes of South Louisiana. In the predominantly Catholic region of Acadiana, meat is consumed sparingly during the Lenten season leading up to Easter. Gumbo Z’herbes, (gumbo of herbs), has become an alternative usually served on Holy Thursday or Good Friday and contains nine different kinds of herbs.

Egg Gumbo
Sometimes they are boiled, and sometimes they are poached. Either way, many people enjoy adding an egg or many eggs to their gumbo. Some people even drop in whisked eggs to make their gumbo similar to egg drop soup.

Gumbo with Potato Salad
When it comes to potato salad in gumbo, you either read this and knew exactly what we are talking about or thought that we had lost our mind. The gumbo potato salad has no eggs or pickles and is mostly mashed and is perfect for eating with gumbo, whether you scoop it right into the gumbo bowl, or serve it on the side. This concept is regional and comes from the most southern parts of Louisiana.

Gumbo with Okra
The word gumbo comes from the Bantu word “achinggumbo” which translates to okra. While it may be etymologically correct to say that all gumbos must contain okra, that isn’t always the case. Some Louisiana cooks have a distaste for okra and use other thickening agents such as filé instead of okra.

Here at Slap Ya Mama, we know all about Gumbo. We love gumbo so much, we have a prize-winning gumbo recipe of our own. We always love experimenting with new unique recipe ideas, so who knows which of these gumbos we will try next. Do you have a gumbo recipe that differs from the norm? Let us know in the comments!

All About Gumbo

The Comfort Food of Louisiana

 

easy cajun dishes

 

Locals, transplants, and tourists alike know that Louisiana is known for its delicious and unique cuisine with gumbo being one of the most sought out dishes. Fall in Louisiana is a brief transition separating our warm summers from the relatively mild winters. It would be more appropriate to call this time of year gumbo season. Gumbo is a hearty, stew-like soup that is beloved across Louisiana. This dish crosses all class barriers, appearing on the tables of the poor and the wealthy, alike. The ingredients can vary widely from one cook to the next and from one region of the state to another, but two elements are constant: roux, a sauce thickener that is a mix of equal parts flour and fat, and the trinity, a blend of onion, celery, and bell pepper. 

To thicken a gumbo, filé (sassafras leaves ground into a powder) or okra can be added. There are no set rules as far as the primary meat, although the most popular versions of gumbo are either chicken and sausage based or seafood based. Gumbo is often cited as an example of the melting-pot nature of Louisiana cooking. The name itself is derived from the West African word for okra, suggesting that gumbo was originally made with okra. Dr. Carl A. Brasseaux of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette found in his research that the first documented references to gumbo appeared around the turn of the 19th century. Gumbo has influence from many different cultures including Choctaw, French, Cajun, Creole, and African. The stew-like soup is viewed as a mixture of all cultures and influences in one pot that everyone is bound to enjoy.

Walker & Sons has formulated an alternative to preparing your favorite Cajun dishes. When it comes to gumbo, many families take a full day out of their schedule to make this dish perfect. In 2017, it’s difficult to find the time to devote to this dish. Slap Ya Mama has perfected our dinner mixes so that you and your family can enjoy easy cajun dishes. In just minutes and with little effort, you can have great tasting, stove cooked gumbo for the entire family. Just add your chicken and sausage or seafood, bring to a boil, let it simmer and serve it.

Cajun Food Increases in Popularity Across America

Cajun Food Increases in Popularity Across America

What in the world is a Cajun restaurant doing in the mountains of Colorado? From the moment that Raymond Griffin decided that he had a dream, a small step became a $100,000 accomplishment. Raymond Griffin had dreams of opening up a Cajun food restaurant chain and spreading his love of traditional Louisiana food around the country.

Previous, he was working a six-figure job in Lafitte, Louisiana as a national training director for a conversion van business. However, he found himself dreaming of taking his days to the water to fish. He quit his job, opened a lodge and operated a business with his late wife Belinda for 15 years. During this time, he became a full-blown Cajun chef.

The lodge ended up being a safe haven. After a whirlwind of disasters in the mid-2000s, (Hurricane Katrine, Rita, Ike, Gustav and the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill), the lodge became a housing facility for BP workers.

When things settled, Griffins hopped in a RV and took a well-deserved vacation. By the time him and his wife reached Frisco, his wife’s back gave out and they settled into Frisco. It was then when he came up with the concept of The Lost Cajun.

The response was amazing. Originally with only 4 items on the menu, the crowds demanded more. He realized long before that people who visit New Orleans and then seek out shrimp étoufée at home find it disappointing.

Part of the success and joy of The Lost Cajun is the educational experience. Once you walk in, you’re handed a sample platter on a paddle with seafood gumbo, chicken and sausage gumbo, crawfish étoufée, red beans and rice, lobster bisque, and chicken and sausage jambalaya.

With only 15 seats, the original restaurant consistently does $777,000 to $790,000 in annual sales, and has grown 20 percent each year. The second unit say a similar year-to-year increase and then the franchise plan hatched.

Now, The Lost Cajun are in the towns of Littleton, Glenwood Springs, Pagosa Springs, Fort Collins, Colorado. Two are in South Carolina, two are in Texas and one in San Antonio.

Griffin says “When I opened the store, I didn’t know what food cost was. I didn’t know what labor cost was. I didn’t know anything about operating a restaurant. The only things I knew was how to produce good food and how to give great service. Those two things right there I truly believe with all my heart and if you do those two things first, all the other things will fall in place.”

This story gives Slap Ya Mama a warm and fuzzy feeling because our faith in our product is similar. We know how to deliver great cajun seasoning, regardless of dietary restrictions as well. We have been humbled by the embrace to our product and intend on selling our seasoning blend around the country so that people can enjoy the comfort of cajun cooking in their kitchen no matter where they are.

Home

Slap Ya Mama offers a wide variety of cajun food products from the heart of Cajun country, including seasonings, hot sauce, dinner mixes, and fish fry.

Warm Recipes for Cold Weather

The cold weather has been pretty harsh this year so far. Recently, an arctic blast visited New Orleans and set teeth chattering and forced people to bring out their space heaters and warmest blankets. In the south, we know the best way to counteract the cold and frigid temperatures: comfort food. There are similarities among most of our dishes in Louisiana: fresh cajun spices, delicious meat, and tons of flavor. If you are looking for dishes to prepare for your family to warm up this winter season, Slap Ya Mama has three must do dishes you should try!

White Beans and Sausage

We love beans here in Louisiana and red beans are a Monday staple. However, white beans are beloved just as much as if not more in the south and prepared in various ways. In addition to being delicious, white beans promote good healthy and wrinkle-free skin and deliver a hefty supply of antioxidants.

White Beans Recipe

Gumbo

Some people refer to cold weather as gumbo weather. Luckily, here at Slap Ya Mama we know a thing a two about gumbo and have a treasured recipe that has been passed down through our family. Check out our famous gumbo recipe!

Mama’s Gumbo Recipe

Grillades

This dish can be found on the menu at debutante balls and is definitely a staple during Mardi Gras. Grillades is a dish of smothered beef, slow simmered in a roux and tomato base and served over creamy, cheesy grits. This recipe calls for our very own seasoning!

Grillades and Grits

We hope that you are staying warm during these unnaturally cold spells that we have been having here in Louisiana and we hope that these recipes warm not only your belly but your heart. Happy New Year from all of us here at Slap Ya Mama!

Cajun Mardi Gras Celebrations

Cajun Mardi Gras Celebrations

It’s time for an old-fashioned Louisiana Mardi Gras! Fiddles and accordions are blasting, and chickens are being tossed so high you’d almost think they were flying. Costumed revelers who look like they came straight out of medieval history sporting fringed and wire mesh feudal outfits on horseback, chasing chickens and begging for ingredients for a huge communal gumbo. Louisiana Cajun Country’s Courir de Mardi Gras - a tradition that dates all the way back to medieval celebrations in France.

Traditions of Louisiana Cajun Mardi Gras

Outside of the stunningly decorated floats and crowned kings and queens you find in New Orleans Carnival festivities, Cajun Mardi Gras is a festival of French origins and a celebration of amazing gumbo - and it all begins on Mardi Gras Day.

Cajun Mardi Gras Celebrations

Courir de Mardi Gras - Photo courtesy of cajunzydecophotos

On the morning of Fat Tuesday, costumed revelers take the streets wearing handmade medieval jester dresses sporting capuchons hats from French traditions that mocked nobility in the medieval era, and bishop miters for the Catholic papal state. It was all a way to escape the roles of life on a daily basis and live like you don’t have a care in the world. The hustle and bustle of everyday life was drowned away by the sounds of Cajun bands playing and the smell of delectable Cajun country cooking. When the horseback revelers took the streets, Courir de Gras began.

Courir de Mardi Gras

The main event of Cajun Mardi Gras. Costumed revelers on horseback are led by the capitaine of Mardi Gras in the traditional celebration of Courir de Gras, where they’d travel from house to house begging for ingredients for a communal gumbo that would feed the town. But you wouldn’t just receive the ingredients. You need to work for it - and by work we mean an assortment of rituals that included dancing atop their horses, climbing trees, and making chicken noises. Homeowners would then toss live chickens into the air for revelers to chase and swing around their heads. The horsemen are joined by men riding on chicken wagons and trailers to catch the most chickens for the communal gumbo while offering cold beer and sausage, and providing musical entertainment for homes they passed by. Thankfully, you don’t have to wait for the race to be over before the gumbo is prepared. The food is now prepped prior and during the race while awaiting its last ingredient once the race is over - chicken.

Each town in Cajun country has their own unique way of celebrating Courir de Gras. The towns feature various foods and events that really bring out the Cajun experience you’re looking for. For example, in Basile, you’ll find a courir for the kids held a few days before Fat Tuesday.

Parade and Musical Entertainment

Once the run comes to an end, the Mardi Gras parades soon follow. In Cajun country, you won’t find parade floats featuring intricate gowns or elaborate mockups. You will instead find homemade costumes and handmade decorated floats pulled by trucks rather than tractors. The parades are also accompanied by traditional music featuring Cajun bands playing the fiddle, accordion, guitar, and the must-hear washboard.

Cajun Mardi Gras is definitely a sight to see. If you want to experience something different than New Orleans Carnivale, everyone is welcome to come down to Cajun Country. Spend Mardi Gras this year in Cajun country for an experience you’ll never forget. Just read what National Geographic’s Young Explorer Caroline Gerdes had to say from her experience going from New Orleans Carnival to Cajun Mardi Gras.